Friday, March 15, 2013

Financial Education: Where Literacy & STEM Meet

Source: CEE
If you ask a roomful of educators, they'll all insist that personal finance education is vital for the recession-era generation. If you ask a roomful of superintendents, however, they'll likely grouse that their districts don't have the time, training, resources, curriculum, testing, and/or support for financial literacy classes. Even as this week's news has highlighted the emerging economic standards for K-12 students, many teachers feel ill-supported to incorporate the ideas of budgeting and investing into their lessons.

Fortunately, the Council For Economic Education (CEE) has prepared an array of carefully conceived resources to blend financial literacy into state curricula. We've long been advocates for folding the ideas of stocks, inflation, trade and consumerism into any existing class.


The United States Of Financial & Economic Literacy from Plusign on Vimeo.


Source: CEE
On March 1, 2013, we had the opportunity to attend the Annual Conference of the New York State Council for the Social Studies. We heard from Rick Fenner, a professor at Utica College and Director of the Mohawk Valley Center For Economic Education. Fenner introduced us to economic topics from U.S. history as well as the terrific site, EconEdLink. Developed by the CEE, EconEdLink presents free videos, links, data, and home extensions on a range of topics from advertising to entrepreneurship. It also allows for free personal accounts to save customized lessons and notes.

Source: Survey Of The States
The motion infographic (above), entitled "The United States Of Financial And Economic Literacy," was prepared by the CEE and designed by Plusign to broadcast startling statistics about today's monetary awareness. Meant as a companion to the "Survey Of The States" interactive website, the clip illustrates the urgent need for more financial literacy in our schools.

For an important reflection on the history of "money" education, we recommend "Why Financial Literacy Fails," by J.D. Roth in Time magazine. For other guidelines about layering economics into your lessons, check out the Jump$tart Coalition For Personal Financial Literacy.

Source: CEE

9 comments:

  1. I appreciate with this and if you have some more information please share it with me.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You just have so much guts to go on and tell it think it's great is. A really nice info blog. Continue making this kind of important blog post. That's pleasant and useful blog site for almost all thanks. Ali Mudeen

    ReplyDelete
  3. You create sense out of the foremost complex topics.kidzlovelearning.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Programs like these ones are noteworthy. There's a need to promote financial literacy especially in the third world countries and in our own backyards as well. CFP exams

    ReplyDelete
  5. I see the greatest contents on your blog and I extremely love reading them.rate my writers

    ReplyDelete
  6. Very helpful article. Just wanted to mention that if you're interested in learning more about the financial sector, how it works, and how you can give yourself a competitive advantage you should investigate some of the many financial services analytics software solutions out there. My company began using Modern Analytics for our analytical needs a few months ago and the results have already been extensive for us. Just wanted to share my insight!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The rationale behind the use of corporate finance was the dominance of corporate form of business organization in the business world. Milton Barbarosh

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


Pin It